25 Jan 2020

Music for Milan Cathedral

Music for Milan Cathedral
Werrecore – Josquin – Gaffurius – Weerbeke
Siglo de Oro, Patrick Allies
Delphian - DCD34224

This disc celebrates and contextualises the music of Hermann Matthias Werrecore (c1500-c1574) maestro di cappella of Milan Cathedral for nearly three decades. A key figure in the post-Josquin (Josquin des Pres c1450-1521) generation, and one of many Oltremontani (from over the Alps) working in Northern Italy, his sacred works have not previously been recorded despite the quality and variety of his settings and their clear influence by, and homage to Josquin. Alongside six of his motets are also first recordings of works by Dominique Phinot (c1510-c1556) and Gaspar van Weerbeke (c1445- c1516).

The smooth honeyed sound of Siglo de Oro is largely due to the soft and clear sheen of their radiant sopranos. As an ensemble they resemble The Cardinall's Musick both in tone and in their approach to the architecture of larger-scale motets such as Josquin's Alma redemptoris mater / Ave regina caelorum: they choose unhurried tempos but maintain a clear forwards direction in phrasing. Most fascinating on this album are the contrasted settings of Inviolata, integra et casta by Werrecore and Josquin which show a huge attention to detail in performance. [...]

To read the full text of this article please visit www.gramophone.co.uk (Feb 2020)

24 Jan 2020

Hellinck: Missa Surrexit pastor; Lupi: Te Deum & motets

Hellinck: Missa Surrexit pastor; Lupi: Te Deum & motets
The Brabant Ensemble, Stephen Rice
Hyperion CDA68304


Forget the glamour of Hollywood's Rat Pack, the sixteenth century had a Wolf Pack of musicians whose names derive from the Latin 'Lupus'. The two composers on this disc may not be the best-known, but their music can be as suave and smooth as anything sung by "Ol' Blue Eyes" himself.

Lupus Hellinck's (1493/4-1541) five voice Missa Surrexit pastor bonus is based on a motet by the Andreas de Silva (fl.1520s). The textures are bright and spacious with delightful trio and duet sections punctuating the movements. This pairing of upper voices suits the generally bright and perky performance style of The Brabant Ensemble and I also admire the pacing: erring towards brisk, the proportions of the movements are clear and the false relations cheekily piquant. [...]


To read the full text of this article please visit www.gramophone.co.uk (Feb 2020)